Mined Opinions For API: org.yaml

This tab contains all the opinions collected from Stack Overflow about the API. The other tabs present summaries of the opinions using different algorithms.
  • Writing to a file on the filesystem is almost never going to be as fast as a socket connection.. details
  • wish I could upvote this more.. details
  • What you can do is that 1.ask the server side to return a valid json format to you, 2. or you can use YAML library to extract the key- pair value.. details
  • wish I could upvote this more.. details
  • You could also consider URL_http://www.yaml.org/ [YAML] which seems less used, but is more "powerful".. details
  • You could also consider URL_http://www.yaml.org/ [YAML] which seems less used, but is more "powerful".. details
  • I like YAML, and about 12 languages with third-party libraries are listed at yaml.org.. details
  • You can use YAML library to transverse your jSON-like string .. details
  • This is not a JSON string but luckily a YAML standrd format.. details
  • It would be nice if there were more examples out there on using protocol buffers.. details
  • It would be nice if there were more examples out there on using protocol buffers.. details
  • Thanks for this info, that is what I suspected, but I found few things out there on google about using protocol buffers.. details
  • Well YAML is sort-of a superset of JSON, and it (at least sometimes) doesn't require quotes around property names.. details
  • The Protostuff library uses the Protocol Buffers data model (so you get structural validation for free) but support serializing to JSON and YAML in addition to other formats.. details
  • The Protostuff library uses the Protocol Buffers data model (so you get structural validation for free) but support serializing to JSON and YAML in addition to other formats.. details
  • Encoding your data to a stream of bytes (JSON, XML, YAML, X.509 DER, Java Serialization) 2.. details
  • The way my yaml deserializer works, it defaults JSON objects to CODETERM2 when you don't specify a type, but gson doesn't seem to do this.. details
  • And then call it like: CODESNIPPET_JAVA3 .. details
  • You can register this adapter like: CODESNIPPET_JAVA2 .. details
  • The other standard comparison is YAML, which is able to serialize complex data sets without relying upon a DTD and needs a simpler parser to both read and write than XML.. details
  • YAML::XS ( URL_http://search.cpan.org/dist/YAML-LibYAML /) is currently the best YAML parser for Perl.. details
  • I'm looking for a super simple JSON or YAML library (not particularly bothered which one) written in Java, and can be used in both GWT on the client, and in its original Java form on the server.. details
  • I want to design the web service in between to be as simple as possible, and decided to take the RESTful approach.. details
  • On the other hand, using JSON, XML or YAML will make it easier to debug as what gets transmitted will be readable.. details
  • Both have pretty good query languages (XPATH and SQL) for structured/nested data.. details
  • Host: I like YAML in /etc.. details
  • (This is where it gets interesting.). details
  • Templates can be viewed as a kind of configuration files.. .. details
  • (Version control usually follows this model...) Complexity Are there only a few flat values?. details
  • Might it be a desirable feature to permit some form of scripting?. details
  • YAML, for the simple reason that it makes for very readable configuration files compared to XML.. details
  • Also, if you're using a good IDE like Visual Studio, and if the XML comes with a schema, you can give the schema to VS and magically you get intellisense (you can get one for NHibernate for example).. details
  • It also seems to me that the combination of XML and XPath hits a sweet spot for data formats that need to be extensible; that is to say, its pretty easy to write XML-processing code that wont fail in the presence of changes to the message format that dont touch the piece you care about.. details
  • May be my OP was not clear.. details
  • Besides the consuming side would have to periodically poll the file to look for new input, which means you're already losing time.. details
  • Adding dependencies can be a hassle.. details
  • The messiness inside the CODETERM7 method is for making sure you only ever get a Double or an Integer or a Long, and probably could be better, or at least simplified if you're okay with getting BigDecimals, which I believe is the default.. details
  • To make a long story short, I need some type of simple YAML or JSON library, which allows me to encode and decode manually, so I can generate this code through my annotation processor.. details
  • So in order to avoid it, I decided to implement annotations to keep track of attributes on the models.. details
  • My problem is that I know our application will grow substantially in the future, and writing all the getters, setters, serialization, factories, etc.. details
  • by hand fills me with absolute dread.. details
  • What I'm trying to do is this: I have my models, which are shared between the client and the server, and these are the primary source of data interchange.. details
  • SQLite implements a very robust data storage engine that is extremely difficult to corrupt when you have power outages or programs that are hung in an inconsistent state due to errors.. details
  • If your data is a bit more complicated, with nesting etc, you are probably better off with YAML, XML, or SQLite.. details
  • Corruptible data leads to high field support costs, and SQLite will do much better than any home-grown solution or even popular libraries around XML or YAML.. details
  • SQLite implements a very robust data storage engine that is extremely difficult to corrupt when you have power outages or programs that are hung in an inconsistent state due to errors.. details
  • But for something more complex like server configuration, an INI file would be a huge pain to maintain, and something more structural like XML or YAML would be better.. details
  • Is the data nested, or dependent in some way?. details
  • This still says it all for me about XML and why it's still a valid choice for config files (from URL_http://www.tbray.org/ongoing/When/200x/2006/12/21/JSON [Tim-Bray] ): _"If you want to provide general-purpose data that the receiver might want to do unforeseen weird and crazy things with, or if you want to be really paranoid and picky about i18n, or if what youre sending is more like a document than a struct, or if the order of the data matters, or if the data is potentially long-lived (as in, more than seconds) XML is the way to go.. details
  • There's nothing wrong with XML, it's reasonably human readable (as much as YAML or JSON or INI files are) but remember its intent is to be read by machines.. details
  • This still says it all for me about XML and why it's still a valid choice for config files (from URL_http://www.tbray.org/ongoing/When/200x/2006/12/21/JSON [Tim-Bray] ): _"If you want to provide general-purpose data that the receiver might want to do unforeseen weird and crazy things with, or if you want to be really paranoid and picky about i18n, or if what youre sending is more like a document than a struct, or if the order of the data matters, or if the data is potentially long-lived (as in, more than seconds) XML is the way to go.. details
Summaries the opinions about org.yaml using topic modeling.
  • 0. format schema model buffer structural pair intellisense nhibernate serializing ide: 10
    • wish I could upvote this more.. details
    • What you can do is that 1.ask the server side to return a valid json format to you, 2. or you can use YAML library to extract the key- pair value.. details
    • You could also consider YAML which seems less used, but is more "powerful".. details
    • This is not a JSON string but luckily a YAML standrd format.. details
    • It would be nice if there were more examples out there on using protocol buffers.. details
    • The Protostuff library uses the Protocol Buffers data model (so you get structural validation for free) but support serializing to JSON and YAML in addition to other formats.. details
    • YAML::XS ( /) is currently the best YAML parser for Perl.. details
    • (This is where it gets interesting.). details
    • (Version control usually follows this model...) Complexity Are there only a few flat values?. details
    • Also, if you're using a good IDE like Visual Studio, and if the XML comes with a schema, you can give the schema to VS and magically you get intellisense (you can get one for NHibernate for example).. details
  • 1. property superset quote require sort kind configuration nest structured view: 7
    • I like YAML, and about 12 languages with third-party libraries are listed at yaml.org.. details
    • Well YAML is sort-of a superset of JSON, and it (at least sometimes) doesn't require quotes around property names.. details
    • And then call it like: CODESNIPPET .. details
    • On the other hand, using JSON, XML or YAML will make it easier to debug as what gets transmitted will be readable.. details
    • Both have pretty good query languages (XPATH and SQL) for structured/nested data.. details
    • Templates can be viewed as a kind of configuration files.. .. details
    • Host: I like YAML in /etc.. details
  • 2. format der byte stream form script permit encode hit piece: 3
    • Encoding your data to a stream of bytes (JSON, XML, YAML, X.509 DER, Java Serialization) 2.. details
    • Might it be a desirable feature to permit some form of scripting?. details
    • It also seems to me that the combination of XML and XPath hits a sweet spot for data formats that need to be extensible; that is to say, its pretty easy to write XML-processing code that wont fail in the presence of changes to the message format that dont touch the piece you care about.. details
  • 3. write buffer form simple gwt original info filesystem thing socket: 6
    • Writing to a file on the filesystem is almost never going to be as fast as a socket connection.. details
    • You can use YAML library to transverse your jSON-like string .. details
    • Thanks for this info, that is what I suspected, but I found few things out there on google about using protocol buffers.. details
    • The way my yaml deserializer works, it defaults JSON objects to Map<String, Object> when you don't specify a type, but gson doesn't seem to do this.. details
    • You can register this adapter like: CODESNIPPET .. details
    • I'm looking for a super simple JSON or YAML library (not particularly bothered which one) written in Java, and can be used in both GWT on the client, and in its original Java form on the server.. details
  • 4. simple write rely dtd serialize read standard comparison decide compare: 3
    • The other standard comparison is YAML, which is able to serialize complex data sets without relying upon a DTD and needs a simpler parser to both read and write than XML.. details
    • I want to design the web service in between to be as simple as possible, and decided to take the RESTful approach.. details
    • YAML, for the simple reason that it makes for very readable configuration files compared to XML.. details
  • 0. grow future setter factory getters write fill absolute decode short: 3
    • To make a long story short, I need some type of simple YAML or JSON library, which allows me to encode and decode manually, so I can generate this code through my annotation processor.. details
    • by hand fills me with absolute dread.. details
    • My problem is that I know our application will grow substantially in the future, and writing all the getters, setters, serialization, factories, etc.. details
  • 1. sqlite implement state extremely outage storage power poll ini engine: 4
    • Besides the consuming side would have to periodically poll the file to look for new input, which means you're already losing time.. details
    • SQLite implements a very robust data storage engine that is extremely difficult to corrupt when you have power outages or programs that are hung in an inconsistent state due to errors.. details
    • Corruptible data leads to high field support costs, and SQLite will do much better than any home-grown solution or even popular libraries around XML or YAML.. details
    • But for something more complex like server configuration, an INI file would be a huge pain to maintain, and something more structural like XML or YAML would be better.. details
  • 2. long order model sqlite ini provide config bray send youre: 9
    • May be my OP was not clear.. details
    • Adding dependencies can be a hassle.. details
    • The messiness inside the handlePrimitive method is for making sure you only ever get a Double or an Integer or a Long, and probably could be better, or at least simplified if you're okay with getting BigDecimals, which I believe is the default.. details
    • What I'm trying to do is this: I have my models, which are shared between the client and the server, and these are the primary source of data interchange.. details
    • So in order to avoid it, I decided to implement annotations to keep track of attributes on the models.. details
    • If your data is a bit more complicated, with nesting etc, you are probably better off with YAML, XML, or SQLite.. details
    • Is the data nested, or dependent in some way?. details
    • There's nothing wrong with XML, it's reasonably human readable (as much as YAML or JSON or INI files are) but remember its intent is to be read by machines.. details
    • This still says it all for me about XML and why it's still a valid choice for config files (from Tim-Bray ): _"If you want to provide general-purpose data that the receiver might want to do unforeseen weird and crazy things with, or if you want to be really paranoid and picky about i18n, or if what youre sending is more like a document than a struct, or if the order of the data matters, or if the data is potentially long-lived (as in, more than seconds) XML is the way to go.. details
Summaries of the opinions about org.yaml using three algorithms (Textrank, Lexrank and Luhn) adopted from extractive summarization. Each algorithm was used once for the positive opinions and once for the negative opinions.
  • You can register this adapter like: CODESNIPPET JAVA2 .
  • I'm looking for a super simple JSON or YAML library (not particularly bothered which one) written in Java, and can be used in both GWT on the client, and in its original Java form on the server .
  • I want to design the web service in between to be as simple as possible, and decided to take the RESTful approach .
  • What you can do is that 1 ask the server side to return a valid json format to you, 2 or you can use YAML library to extract the key pair value .
  • You can use YAML library to transverse your jSON like string .
  • On the other hand, using JSON, XML or YAML will make it easier to debug as what gets transmitted will be readable .
  • Thanks for this info, that is what I suspected, but I found few things out there on google about using protocol buffers .
  • Well YAML is sort of a superset of JSON, and it (at least sometimes) doesn't require quotes around property names .
  • Also, if you're using a good IDE like Visual Studio, and if the XML comes with a schema, you can give the schema to VS and magically you get intellisense (you can get one for NHibernate for example) .
  • It also seems to me that the combination of XML and XPath hits a sweet spot for data formats that need to be extensible; that is to say, its pretty easy to write XML processing code that wont fail in the presence of changes to the message format that dont touch the piece you care about .
  • The way my yaml deserializer works, it defaults JSON objects to Map<String, Object> when you don't specify a type, but gson doesn't seem to do this .
  • I'm looking for a super simple JSON or YAML library (not particularly bothered which one) written in Java, and can be used in both GWT on the client, and in its original Java form on the server .
  • I want to design the web service in between to be as simple as possible, and decided to take the RESTful approach .
  • What you can do is that 1 ask the server side to return a valid json format to you, 2 or you can use YAML library to extract the key pair value .
  • On the other hand, using JSON, XML or YAML will make it easier to debug as what gets transmitted will be readable .
  • The Protostuff library uses the Protocol Buffers data model (so you get structural validation for free) but support serializing to JSON and YAML in addition to other formats .
  • The other standard comparison is YAML, which is able to serialize complex data sets without relying upon a DTD and needs a simpler parser to both read and write than XML .
  • Also, if you're using a good IDE like Visual Studio, and if the XML comes with a schema, you can give the schema to VS and magically you get intellisense (you can get one for NHibernate for example) .
  • It also seems to me that the combination of XML and XPath hits a sweet spot for data formats that need to be extensible; that is to say, its pretty easy to write XML processing code that wont fail in the presence of changes to the message format that dont touch the piece you care about .
  • Writing to a file on the filesystem is almost never going to be as fast as a socket connection .
  • I'm looking for a super simple JSON or YAML library (not particularly bothered which one) written in Java, and can be used in both GWT on the client, and in its original Java form on the server .
  • What you can do is that 1 ask the server side to return a valid json format to you, 2 or you can use YAML library to extract the key pair value .
  • This is not a JSON string but luckily a YAML standrd format .
  • You can use YAML library to transverse your jSON like string .
  • On the other hand, using JSON, XML or YAML will make it easier to debug as what gets transmitted will be readable .
  • The Protostuff library uses the Protocol Buffers data model (so you get structural validation for free) but support serializing to JSON and YAML in addition to other formats .
  • Thanks for this info, that is what I suspected, but I found few things out there on google about using protocol buffers .
  • YAML, for the simple reason that it makes for very readable configuration files compared to XML .
  • Also, if you're using a good IDE like Visual Studio, and if the XML comes with a schema, you can give the schema to VS and magically you get intellisense (you can get one for NHibernate for example) .
  • It also seems to me that the combination of XML and XPath hits a sweet spot for data formats that need to be extensible; that is to say, its pretty easy to write XML processing code that wont fail in the presence of changes to the message format that dont touch the piece you care about .
  • What I'm trying to do is this: I have my models, which are shared between the client and the server, and these are the primary source of data interchange .
  • by hand fills me with absolute dread .
  • So in order to avoid it, I decided to implement annotations to keep track of attributes on the models .
  • To make a long story short, I need some type of simple YAML or JSON library, which allows me to encode and decode manually, so I can generate this code through my annotation processor .
  • SQLite implements a very robust data storage engine that is extremely difficult to corrupt when you have power outages or programs that are hung in an inconsistent state due to errors .
  • May be my OP was not clear .
  • If your data is a bit more complicated, with nesting etc, you are probably better off with YAML, XML, or SQLite .
  • Adding dependencies can be a hassle .
  • This still says it all for me about XML and why it's still a valid choice for config files (from Tim Bray ): "If you want to provide general purpose data that the receiver might want to do unforeseen weird and crazy things with, or if you want to be really paranoid and picky about i18n, or if what youre sending is more like a document than a struct, or if the order of the data matters, or if the data is potentially long lived (as in, more than seconds) XML is the way to go .
  • But for something more complex like server configuration, an INI file would be a huge pain to maintain, and something more structural like XML or YAML would be better .
  • The messiness inside the handlePrimitive method is for making sure you only ever get a Double or an Integer or a Long, and probably could be better, or at least simplified if you're okay with getting BigDecimals, which I believe is the default .
  • What I'm trying to do is this: I have my models, which are shared between the client and the server, and these are the primary source of data interchange .
  • So in order to avoid it, I decided to implement annotations to keep track of attributes on the models .
  • To make a long story short, I need some type of simple YAML or JSON library, which allows me to encode and decode manually, so I can generate this code through my annotation processor .
  • SQLite implements a very robust data storage engine that is extremely difficult to corrupt when you have power outages or programs that are hung in an inconsistent state due to errors .
  • If your data is a bit more complicated, with nesting etc, you are probably better off with YAML, XML, or SQLite .
  • There's nothing wrong with XML, it's reasonably human readable (as much as YAML or JSON or INI files are) but remember its intent is to be read by machines .
  • This still says it all for me about XML and why it's still a valid choice for config files (from Tim Bray ): "If you want to provide general purpose data that the receiver might want to do unforeseen weird and crazy things with, or if you want to be really paranoid and picky about i18n, or if what youre sending is more like a document than a struct, or if the order of the data matters, or if the data is potentially long lived (as in, more than seconds) XML is the way to go .
  • But for something more complex like server configuration, an INI file would be a huge pain to maintain, and something more structural like XML or YAML would be better .
  • Besides the consuming side would have to periodically poll the file to look for new input, which means you're already losing time .
  • The messiness inside the handlePrimitive method is for making sure you only ever get a Double or an Integer or a Long, and probably could be better, or at least simplified if you're okay with getting BigDecimals, which I believe is the default .
  • What I'm trying to do is this: I have my models, which are shared between the client and the server, and these are the primary source of data interchange .
  • So in order to avoid it, I decided to implement annotations to keep track of attributes on the models .
  • To make a long story short, I need some type of simple YAML or JSON library, which allows me to encode and decode manually, so I can generate this code through my annotation processor .
  • SQLite implements a very robust data storage engine that is extremely difficult to corrupt when you have power outages or programs that are hung in an inconsistent state due to errors .
  • If your data is a bit more complicated, with nesting etc, you are probably better off with YAML, XML, or SQLite .
  • There's nothing wrong with XML, it's reasonably human readable (as much as YAML or JSON or INI files are) but remember its intent is to be read by machines .
  • This still says it all for me about XML and why it's still a valid choice for config files (from Tim Bray ): "If you want to provide general purpose data that the receiver might want to do unforeseen weird and crazy things with, or if you want to be really paranoid and picky about i18n, or if what youre sending is more like a document than a struct, or if the order of the data matters, or if the data is potentially long lived (as in, more than seconds) XML is the way to go .
  • But for something more complex like server configuration, an INI file would be a huge pain to maintain, and something more structural like XML or YAML would be better .
  • Corruptible data leads to high field support costs, and SQLite will do much better than any home grown solution or even popular libraries around XML or YAML .
Summaries of the opinions about org.yaml using Opinosis, an abstractive summarizer of opinions..
  • there on using protocol buffers .
Summaries of the opinions about org.yaml using contrastive viewpoints. Each entry contains a pair of positive and negative sentences that are most likely discussing about similar API features.
Summaries of opinions about based on specific API aspects, such as, performance, usability, etc. The 'Overview' page provides an overview of the aspects detected in the opinions. The 'Trend' page shows the distribution of polarity over time for each aspect. The 'Positive Opinions' page groups positive opinions by the detected aspects. The 'Contrastive By Aspect' page shows paris of contrastive opinions under each aspect (where found).
Features:
  • I like YAML, and about 12 languages with third-party libraries are listed at yaml.org.
  • May be my OP was not clear.
Documentation:
  • It would be nice if there were more examples out there on using protocol buffers.
  • N/A
Legal:
  • The Protostuff library uses the Protocol Buffers data model (so you get structural validation for free) but support serializing to JSON and YAML in addition to other formats.
  • N/A
Onlysentiment:
  • wish I could upvote this more.
  • N/A
Performance:
  • You could also consider URL_http://www.yaml.org/ [YAML] which seems less used, but is more "powerful".
  • SQLite implements a very robust data storage engine that is extremely difficult to corrupt when you have power outages or programs that are hung in an inconsistent state due to errors.
Usability:
  • Writing to a file on the filesystem is almost never going to be as fast as a socket connection.
  • Besides the consuming side would have to periodically poll the file to look for new input, which means you're already losing time.
  • Features: 4
    1. general: 4
      • I like YAML, and about 12 languages with third-party libraries are listed at yaml.org.. details
      • Encoding your data to a stream of bytes (JSON, XML, YAML, X.509 DER, Java Serialization) 2.. details
      • YAML::XS ( URL_http://search.cpan.org/dist/YAML-LibYAML /) is currently the best YAML parser for Perl.. details
      • Host: I like YAML in /etc.. details
  • Documentation: 1
    1. general: 1
      • It would be nice if there were more examples out there on using protocol buffers.. details
  • Legal: 1
    1. general: 1
      • The Protostuff library uses the Protocol Buffers data model (so you get structural validation for free) but support serializing to JSON and YAML in addition to other formats.. details
  • Onlysentiment: 2
    1. general: 2
      • wish I could upvote this more.. details
      • (This is where it gets interesting.). details
  • Performance: 1
    1. general: 1
      • You could also consider URL_http://www.yaml.org/ [YAML] which seems less used, but is more "powerful".. details
  • Usability: 24
    1. string: 1
      • You can use YAML library to transverse your jSON-like string .. details
    2. service: 1
      • I want to design the web service in between to be as simple as possible, and decided to take the RESTful approach.. details
    3. general: 11
      • wish I could upvote this more.. details
      • You could also consider URL_http://www.yaml.org/ [YAML] which seems less used, but is more "powerful".. details
      • It would be nice if there were more examples out there on using protocol buffers.. details
      • Thanks for this info, that is what I suspected, but I found few things out there on google about using protocol buffers.. details
      • Well YAML is sort-of a superset of JSON, and it (at least sometimes) doesn't require quotes around property names.. details
      • And then call it like: CODESNIPPET_JAVA3 .. details
      • You can register this adapter like: CODESNIPPET_JAVA2 .. details
      • On the other hand, using JSON, XML or YAML will make it easier to debug as what gets transmitted will be readable.. details
      • Both have pretty good query languages (XPATH and SQL) for structured/nested data.. details
      • (Version control usually follows this model...) Complexity Are there only a few flat values?. details
      • Might it be a desirable feature to permit some form of scripting?. details
    4. json: 5
      • What you can do is that 1.ask the server side to return a valid json format to you, 2. or you can use YAML library to extract the key- pair value.. details
      • This is not a JSON string but luckily a YAML standrd format.. details
      • The Protostuff library uses the Protocol Buffers data model (so you get structural validation for free) but support serializing to JSON and YAML in addition to other formats.. details
      • The way my yaml deserializer works, it defaults JSON objects to CODETERM2 when you don't specify a type, but gson doesn't seem to do this.. details
      • I'm looking for a super simple JSON or YAML library (not particularly bothered which one) written in Java, and can be used in both GWT on the client, and in its original Java form on the server.. details
    5. file: 1
      • Writing to a file on the filesystem is almost never going to be as fast as a socket connection.. details
    6. configuration: 2
      • Templates can be viewed as a kind of configuration files.. .. details
      • YAML, for the simple reason that it makes for very readable configuration files compared to XML.. details
    7. data: 2
      • The other standard comparison is YAML, which is able to serialize complex data sets without relying upon a DTD and needs a simpler parser to both read and write than XML.. details
      • It also seems to me that the combination of XML and XPath hits a sweet spot for data formats that need to be extensible; that is to say, its pretty easy to write XML-processing code that wont fail in the presence of changes to the message format that dont touch the piece you care about.. details
    8. schema: 1
      • Also, if you're using a good IDE like Visual Studio, and if the XML comes with a schema, you can give the schema to VS and magically you get intellisense (you can get one for NHibernate for example).. details
  • Performance: 2
    1. general: 2
      • SQLite implements a very robust data storage engine that is extremely difficult to corrupt when you have power outages or programs that are hung in an inconsistent state due to errors.. details
      • This still says it all for me about XML and why it's still a valid choice for config files (from URL_http://www.tbray.org/ongoing/When/200x/2006/12/21/JSON [Tim-Bray] ): _"If you want to provide general-purpose data that the receiver might want to do unforeseen weird and crazy things with, or if you want to be really paranoid and picky about i18n, or if what youre sending is more like a document than a struct, or if the order of the data matters, or if the data is potentially long-lived (as in, more than seconds) XML is the way to go.. details
  • Features: 4
    1. general: 4
      • May be my OP was not clear.. details
      • My problem is that I know our application will grow substantially in the future, and writing all the getters, setters, serialization, factories, etc.. details
      • by hand fills me with absolute dread.. details
      • Is the data nested, or dependent in some way?. details
  • Usability: 12
    1. sqlite: 2
      • SQLite implements a very robust data storage engine that is extremely difficult to corrupt when you have power outages or programs that are hung in an inconsistent state due to errors.. details
      • Corruptible data leads to high field support costs, and SQLite will do much better than any home-grown solution or even popular libraries around XML or YAML.. details
    2. double: 1
      • The messiness inside the CODETERM7 method is for making sure you only ever get a Double or an Integer or a Long, and probably could be better, or at least simplified if you're okay with getting BigDecimals, which I believe is the default.. details
    3. general: 1
      • Adding dependencies can be a hassle.. details
    4. json: 2
      • To make a long story short, I need some type of simple YAML or JSON library, which allows me to encode and decode manually, so I can generate this code through my annotation processor.. details
      • There's nothing wrong with XML, it's reasonably human readable (as much as YAML or JSON or INI files are) but remember its intent is to be read by machines.. details
    5. file: 2
      • Besides the consuming side would have to periodically poll the file to look for new input, which means you're already losing time.. details
      • But for something more complex like server configuration, an INI file would be a huge pain to maintain, and something more structural like XML or YAML would be better.. details
    6. data: 3
      • What I'm trying to do is this: I have my models, which are shared between the client and the server, and these are the primary source of data interchange.. details
      • If your data is a bit more complicated, with nesting etc, you are probably better off with YAML, XML, or SQLite.. details
      • This still says it all for me about XML and why it's still a valid choice for config files (from URL_http://www.tbray.org/ongoing/When/200x/2006/12/21/JSON [Tim-Bray] ): _"If you want to provide general-purpose data that the receiver might want to do unforeseen weird and crazy things with, or if you want to be really paranoid and picky about i18n, or if what youre sending is more like a document than a struct, or if the order of the data matters, or if the data is potentially long-lived (as in, more than seconds) XML is the way to go.. details
    7. annotations: 1
      • So in order to avoid it, I decided to implement annotations to keep track of attributes on the models.. details