Mined Opinions For API: javax.naming

This tab contains all the opinions collected from Stack Overflow about the API. The other tabs present summaries of the opinions using different algorithms.
  • Thanks @giampaolo finally I add a few line more to store information in ArrayList: //List of objects to persist List firstTranslationList new ArrayList(); List originalTermList new ArrayList(); List list new ArrayList(principalTranslation.values()); for (Item item : list) { firstTranslationList.add(item.FirstTranslation); originalTermList.add(item.OriginalTerm); } Thanks again :).. details
  • Glad you solved.. details
  • So working perfectly.. details
  • Anyway I usually leave the types in the CODETERM4 objects as simple CODETERM5 and then in the class from where I retrieve the response, I do the correct formatting while creating my objects, for example, when you put the values in your CODETERM6 ... _Note 3_: The use of the annotation CODETERM7 is interesting to separate the name of a field in the JSON response and in your app, in order to follow Java naming conventions, which your attributes are not following... _Note 4_: You shouldn't use CODETERM8 attributes in your classes.. details
  • Since your setter method is named CODETERM1 Jackson assumes the variable is named mDReqID because of the Java naming conventions (variables should start with lower case letters).. details
  • From a Java naming perspective that would be blasphemous, though.. details
Summaries the opinions about javax.naming using topic modeling.
  • 0. item arraylist add response note attribute firsttranslationlist originaltermlist follow convention: 4
    • So working perfectly.. details
    • Thanks @giampaolo finally I add a few line more to store information in ArrayList: //List of objects to persist List firstTranslationList new ArrayList(); List originalTermList new ArrayList(); List list new ArrayList(principalTranslation.values()); for (Item item : list) { firstTranslationList.add(item.FirstTranslation); originalTermList.add(item.OriginalTerm); } Thanks again :).. details
    • Glad you solved.. details
    • Anyway I usually leave the types in the Response objects as simple String and then in the class from where I retrieve the response, I do the correct formatting while creating my objects, for example, when you put the values in your Map ... _Note 3_: The use of the annotation @SerializedName is interesting to separate the name of a field in the JSON response and in your app, in order to follow Java naming conventions, which your attributes are not following... _Note 4_: You shouldn't use public attributes in your classes.. details
  • 0. variable convention low setter setmdreqid case letter assume mdreqid jackson: 2
    • Since your setter method is named setMDReqID() Jackson assumes the variable is named mDReqID because of the Java naming conventions (variables should start with lower case letters).. details
    • From a Java naming perspective that would be blasphemous, though.. details
Summaries of the opinions about javax.naming using three algorithms (Textrank, Lexrank and Luhn) adopted from extractive summarization. Each algorithm was used once for the positive opinions and once for the negative opinions.
  • So working perfectly .
  • Thanks @giampaolo finally I add a few line more to store information in ArrayList: List of objects to persist List firstTranslationList new ArrayList(); List originalTermList new ArrayList(); List list new ArrayList(principalTranslation values()); for (Item item : list) { firstTranslationList add(item FirstTranslation); originalTermList add(item OriginalTerm); } Thanks again :) .
  • Glad you solved .
  • Anyway I usually leave the types in the Response objects as simple String and then in the class from where I retrieve the response, I do the correct formatting while creating my objects, for example, when you put the values in your Map Note 3 : The use of the annotation @SerializedName is interesting to separate the name of a field in the JSON response and in your app, in order to follow Java naming conventions, which your attributes are not following Note 4 : You shouldn't use public attributes in your classes .
  • So working perfectly .
  • Thanks @giampaolo finally I add a few line more to store information in ArrayList: List of objects to persist List firstTranslationList new ArrayList(); List originalTermList new ArrayList(); List list new ArrayList(principalTranslation values()); for (Item item : list) { firstTranslationList add(item FirstTranslation); originalTermList add(item OriginalTerm); } Thanks again :) .
  • Glad you solved .
  • Anyway I usually leave the types in the Response objects as simple String and then in the class from where I retrieve the response, I do the correct formatting while creating my objects, for example, when you put the values in your Map Note 3 : The use of the annotation @SerializedName is interesting to separate the name of a field in the JSON response and in your app, in order to follow Java naming conventions, which your attributes are not following Note 4 : You shouldn't use public attributes in your classes .
  • So working perfectly .
  • Thanks @giampaolo finally I add a few line more to store information in ArrayList: List of objects to persist List firstTranslationList new ArrayList(); List originalTermList new ArrayList(); List list new ArrayList(principalTranslation values()); for (Item item : list) { firstTranslationList add(item FirstTranslation); originalTermList add(item OriginalTerm); } Thanks again :) .
  • Glad you solved .
  • Anyway I usually leave the types in the Response objects as simple String and then in the class from where I retrieve the response, I do the correct formatting while creating my objects, for example, when you put the values in your Map Note 3 : The use of the annotation @SerializedName is interesting to separate the name of a field in the JSON response and in your app, in order to follow Java naming conventions, which your attributes are not following Note 4 : You shouldn't use public attributes in your classes .
  • From a Java naming perspective that would be blasphemous, though .
  • Since your setter method is named setMDReqID() Jackson assumes the variable is named mDReqID because of the Java naming conventions (variables should start with lower case letters) .
  • From a Java naming perspective that would be blasphemous, though .
  • Since your setter method is named setMDReqID() Jackson assumes the variable is named mDReqID because of the Java naming conventions (variables should start with lower case letters) .
  • From a Java naming perspective that would be blasphemous, though .
  • Since your setter method is named setMDReqID() Jackson assumes the variable is named mDReqID because of the Java naming conventions (variables should start with lower case letters) .
Summaries of the opinions about javax.naming using Opinosis, an abstractive summarizer of opinions..
Summaries of the opinions about javax.naming using contrastive viewpoints. Each entry contains a pair of positive and negative sentences that are most likely discussing about similar API features.
Summaries of opinions about based on specific API aspects, such as, performance, usability, etc. The 'Overview' page provides an overview of the aspects detected in the opinions. The 'Trend' page shows the distribution of polarity over time for each aspect. The 'Positive Opinions' page groups positive opinions by the detected aspects. The 'Contrastive By Aspect' page shows paris of contrastive opinions under each aspect (where found).
Features:
  • Thanks @giampaolo finally I add a few line more to store information in ArrayList: //List of objects to persist List firstTranslationList new ArrayList(); List originalTermList new ArrayList(); List list new ArrayList(principalTranslation.values()); for (Item item : list) { firstTranslationList.add(item.FirstTranslation); originalTermList.add(item.OriginalTerm); } Thanks again :).
  • N/A
Usability:
  • So working perfectly.
  • Since your setter method is named CODETERM1 Jackson assumes the variable is named mDReqID because of the Java naming conventions (variables should start with lower case letters).
  • Features: 2
    1. general: 2
      • Thanks @giampaolo finally I add a few line more to store information in ArrayList: //List of objects to persist List firstTranslationList new ArrayList(); List originalTermList new ArrayList(); List list new ArrayList(principalTranslation.values()); for (Item item : list) { firstTranslationList.add(item.FirstTranslation); originalTermList.add(item.OriginalTerm); } Thanks again :).. details
      • Glad you solved.. details
  • Usability: 2
    1. general: 2
      • So working perfectly.. details
      • Anyway I usually leave the types in the CODETERM4 objects as simple CODETERM5 and then in the class from where I retrieve the response, I do the correct formatting while creating my objects, for example, when you put the values in your CODETERM6 ... _Note 3_: The use of the annotation CODETERM7 is interesting to separate the name of a field in the JSON response and in your app, in order to follow Java naming conventions, which your attributes are not following... _Note 4_: You shouldn't use CODETERM8 attributes in your classes.. details
  • Usability: 2
    1. general: 2
      • Since your setter method is named CODETERM1 Jackson assumes the variable is named mDReqID because of the Java naming conventions (variables should start with lower case letters).. details
      • From a Java naming perspective that would be blasphemous, though.. details